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Thread: 1949 [Story]

  1. #1
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    Default 1949 [Story]

    Private James Malasek
    14 September 1949

    The cloud continues to spread, with no sign of stopping. Damien, Preston's most educated man, said that thermal air currents are pushing the cloud across the southwest, right through New Mexico and up to southern Kansas. It's crazy to think about all that's happened in the last 4 years and still not be able to see the disaster itself. The sky's clear as far as the eye can see, for now.

    I hope they send help soon. More troops, more guns, more ammo, more food, anything would be a huge help for the town. The sergeant still hasn't gotten back from Georges, and he was due two days ago. We need the men if we want to keep Preston alive.

    Private James Malasek
    18 September 1949

    Despite all the clamor about the cloud moving east, people are actually coming to Preston, most of them from Ilias to the north. They all come with the same stories, something about the government pushing them all out so they can observe something, probably that blood red cloud on the western front.

    Damien's saying that California's barely civilized anymore, that only places protected by the geography were safe from the dust. I don't know much, but I know I'd hate to be there.

    Most of the day was spent either digging trenches or getting lumber from the forest. Someone, I think it was Anders, passed out from the heat, and he's gotten more than enough beef from the other boys about it. Everyone's on edge lately.

    Private James Malasek
    September 29 1949

    Lots of the townsfolk are packing up, mostly the ones that had just come from Ilias. Seems the cloud's still moving forward, though the meteorologist on the radio says the thing's moving some 20 miles per day, which gives us... around 2 months before the dust reaches Kansas.

    There was a man here the other day, a patient of Damien's. Damien said he'd been exposed to the dust while he was trying to get his family out of Nevada, and now he's gone and lost his mind. The man set in one of the new trenches all day, mumbling something. I wasn't too keen on the idea of getting closer to the man, unfortunate as his case was.

    The sky is still clear, though I think my eyes are starting to trick me from all the nervousness inside me. Somedays I could swear there was a little colorful blotch of red on the horizon around sunrise, but when I check two hours later, there's no sign of it.

    Maybe I shouldn't have listened to that rambling loon.

  2. #2
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    Private James Malasek
    2 October 1949

    Yesterday sergeant Morris got back from Georges, with seven extra men than before (though men is hardly the term for them). It seems his recruitment efforts hadn't gone to waste, but he still wasn't happy with the trade talks. Georges is still adamant about walling up and keeping all the resources they can inside, but they didn't seem to care about the sergeant fishing up some recruits.

    Still, the new boys are just that; boys. None of them could've been older than 17, and one even looked just past 12.

    Anyway, the radio keeps talking about how some big Soviet port's being evacuated, Vladi-something. Apparently the winds that were keeping the cloud out of Russia have turned because of a volcanic eruption to the south west. I just can't believe Russia's been so safe until now, and apparently neither can the political ranter the station employs. This guy could go on for hours about how the it's "the Soviets' turn to bear the burden" and how "Stalin must be cowering 500 miles away in Moscow". It's like we're big rivals or something.

  3. #3
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    I do like the way you're introducing this all in journal form, and I think it's a nice touch. However, I don't know your plan for this, but I don't think that the entire story should play out in journal form. Otherwise, what positive aspects you've achieved by doing this will quickly be lost for wont of the feeling of cohesiveness and detail that more conventional storytelling provides.

    But really, for an introduction, this is good; it's attention-getting and brings out some interesting characterization. Just don't draw it out too long.


    That kind old lady stopped the rain for us.
    She said it would only make us cold, and miserable, and sick.
    We thanked her and hugged her and she walked away smiling warmly.
    I miss the puddles...

  4. #4
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    ((Duely noted.))

    Private James Malasek
    14 October 1949

    Yesterday the mayor and sergeant decided to start the town's evacuation, which is surely no coincidence. Just the day before, a little helicopter touched down in the town square, and four or five 401 regiment troops got out. One of them walked right inside town hall, probably to have a very stern word with the mayor. The cloud's still a month away, but the mayor says he isn't going to take a chance with people's lives.

    So here I am, piling hay on a cart for the stock, when that patient of Damien's grabs my arm. He started shouting giberish, but I managed to make out a few words, shaken as I was.

    "Red everywhere -- I should have put you down -- get them out of me". I guess the mayor's as right as anyone to want to get away from that shield of crimson some 600 miles away.


    James put down the small leatherbound book and pen, tucking them both in a small pouch to his right. Picking up the pouch and his battered rifle, he strode over to the base of the watchtower. He slapped the wooden ladder to the nest twice before beginning to climb, and propped his rifle carefully on the nest's barrier once he reached the top. Groves, an aging soldier that fought in the Bulge, pushed by him, leaving the binoculars on a small handcrafted shelf facing the dry expanse to the west of Preston. James picked up the bulky magnifiers, placing them to his eyes and squinting as he scanned the horizon. Still nothing but emptyness and warm, clear skies. Deep in the desert, little creatures stirred, probably rabits digging themselves into the arid earth or snakes searching for prey. Something else moved in the distance... a man.

    James put down the binoculars and turned to face the small town below him. "Sergeant!" He shouted.

  5. #5
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    I want moar.
    http://i765.photobucket.com/albums/xx292/morgana5/Forum%20Sigs/jannge.png
    Sig made by Morgana
    Never forget those who died in WW2
    Quote Originally Posted by Holeypaladin View Post
    That's just funny.

    Jannge is awesome.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v-DwjX-0E_8

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